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POLYCHARGER

Posted by buda 
POLYCHARGER
October 07, 2010 10:10AM
Say Bill, do you think this product would enhance the abilities of your acrylic sealant.

They make some marvelous claims.

Check it out www.polycharger.com



Regards
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 08, 2010 12:47AM
Bud

I am familiar with this product.

Polycharger- Wax Booster
Polycharger- Wax BoosterPolycharger is a professional strength additive for consumer grade and boutique brand car waxes.

Polycharger is the cure-all prescription for car waxes that don't last through more than a few washes. Polycharger is for people who have limited time to wax and maintain their car's paint finish and those who demand the very best paint protection and a long-lasting shine.

Polycharger is a polymer booster for liquid waxes, paint sealants, and quick detail sprays. Polycharger added to an ordinary wax makes it extraordinary! Improve the shine, durability, and protection of your favorite wax.

# Offers superior protection you can see, wash-after-wash!
# Saves you time & money!
# Works with your favorite wax product.


Polycharger is designed for solvent and water based waxes.

Unfortunately, the polymers used in consumer car waxes never get to do their full job. That’s because most car waxes fail in the transition from a liquid to a dry film. Polymers are long molecules capable of interlinking to form a mesh of molecule strands. This interlocking capability, called cross-linking, is what gives polymers their terrific strength. Unfortunately, most car waxes fail to cross-link when applied to the surface of your car.

Blackfire Wet Diamond uses polycharger in their formulation. It does offer protection,but it does not bond to the clear coat like AT-5 does. It has to be reapplied twice a year. At-5 is good for 12 months

To answer your question. No, it would not enhance AT-5's abilty. Why? Because
AT-5 does not need it. It has a shine equal to any wax, seals and bonds to the
micro pores of the clear coat

In fact, I did a white Lexus today that I have done two times in the past. The last time was around 20 months ago. It was in a condo garage that is right near
the beach on the Gulf of Mexico. It was filthy and covered with salt.

I washed it with Dawn, used a clay bar, and applied a new coat of AT-5 by hand.
Not a mark on it, and it looked awesome. The $150 for the job was nice also.


If any of you remember the Miami Vice series on TV. All those cars had AT-5
on them. I know that because the guys that applied it trained me.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 10/08/2010 12:57AM by billd55.
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 08, 2010 01:01AM
Bill you have repeated nothing that is not already on the Polycharger website, sales BS.

You have done nothing to explain to the public what Polycharger is, which is nothing but measured amino-functional silicone, which is what I have tried to tell you is what is in AT5, like all other paint sealants.

The only thing you say that is accurate is that a paint sealant is different than a wax.

How, you have not really explained that other than to say waxes are no good, yet you know nothing about what is in a wax.

Or, for that matter you do not seem to know what is in a paint sealant either.

Regards
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 08, 2010 12:56PM
Bud
You asked me a question and I answered it:do you think this product would enhance the abilities of your acrylic sealant. I said no.<br>

So what is your point?Are all paint sealants the same? You tested many so called
paint sealants, but I am sure that all were different in what they offered as far
protection and shine. <br>

You have done nothing to explain to the public what Polycharger is, which is nothing but measured amino-functional silicone, which is what I have tried to tell you is what is in AT5, like all other paint sealants.

Ok. Polycharger is, which is nothing but measured amino-functional silicone,
does that make you happy. <br>
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 08, 2010 07:49PM
Quote
buda
Bill you have repeated nothing that is not already on the Polycharger website, sales BS.

You have done nothing to explain to the public what Polycharger is, which is nothing but measured amino-functional silicone, which is what I have tried to tell you is what is in AT5, like all other paint sealants.

INCORRECT. Tonnes do but what I have made and custom blended is not a polymer. it is glass and titanium. put it on and it turns to glass.
measure your car with a thickness gauge afterwards and the reading increases.
usually 110 microns from factory with our australian cars, after a treatment become 140 - 200 depending on how many times its been buffed on with orbital at speed 1 with the proper pads

POLYCHARGER is not needed because I dont buy consumer grade products or use the crap sealants that Autogeek and Proper Auto care use. Its light years behind what I am using
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 08, 2010 08:59PM
Sorry if these are going to be annoying questions...

What are you making in Australia? Is it like AGlaze or the G1/Nanolex type products?

Also, who makes this AT-5. I googled it and didn't find the manufacturer. Its not in an aerosol, is it? What I saw was Acrylic Teflon sealant.

I thought a lot about the way teflon works in a car care product. It is too neutral to bond and protect the paint, no? So does it instead protect the acrylic sealant on the paint rather than the paint itself?
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 08, 2010 10:17PM
AT-5 is made overseas by a manufacture in Europe. It is sold in the states by
Gem industries.

[www.gem-industries.com]

AT-5 bonds to the clear coat through chemical adhesion. Most clear coats are
acrylic urea thane paints. The clear is first cleaned so the micro pores of the
paint can bond with the sealant.

Once applied, it protects the clear coat from damage for one year.It is a liquid,
and it can be applied by hand.It offers outstanding protection from salt.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 10/08/2010 10:30PM by billd55.
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 08, 2010 10:39PM
Bill

Can you please explain more clearly what is "chemical adhesion." My experience with AT5 is that is applies no different than any other sealant.

Most clear-coat paint finishes are "polyurethane enamel."

Are you certain that the clear coat paint has "pores?"

One year? How can you prove that? All chemists I speak to from sealant companies say no more than 3 to 4 months without a renewal.

What is "outstanding" protection from salt. How long? In our tests where we misted metal panels that had various sealants applied to them the rust appeared in a matter of minutes, not days, weeks or months?

To what pH level does AT5 protect against acid rain damage?

Regards
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 09, 2010 12:19AM
Bud

You have asked this question at least 4 times. Most clear coats are acrylic urethanes because of cost.

Acrylic urethane coatings are a bit cheaper and generally one notch down from the polyester urethane paints in terms of toughness and chemical resistance, but still above ‘regular’ paints. Acrylic urethanes are found in clear-coats used in the automobile industry Source:[www.epoxyproducts.com]


Since you have no experience with AT-5 then you should read this about how it bonds.

Fill the pores with a unique PTFE resin (plasticizer). This will form a barrier that will prevent penetration of any other elements. The
dimethoxysilydimethylaminoethylaminopropyl polymer and methyltrimethoxysilanes allow the total formula to plate, bond and crosslink. This
product gives the depth of shine, durability, corrosion protection, spot resistance and excellent detergent resistance.
Phenylpropylsilsesquioxanes is the protector of all the others already in place. It is an acrylic which when fully cured, is a hard durable, antistatic,
transparent, protective layer and gloss enhancer.
To allow all this to happen a special patented surface preparation is part of the system. In the preparation solution a “cationic” (positive)
surfactant is used to purge the pores of the surfaces to be treated, and magnetically charge the surface in a positive polarity. The pores are
cleansed and charged and are ready to receive the unique “anionic” or negatively charged molecules of polytetrafluorothylene (PTFE). They are
pulled into the pores magnetically and held there while all of the protective chemicals have cross linked, bonded and cured, locking the PTFE
into the paint and preventing drifting, fading and degradation of the paint to years to come. Solar heat will expand the PTFE molecules to give
even further protection

Logistiseal did tests for salt. This is basically At-5, but modified a bit.

[www.logisticlean.com]


Cannot answer your question on acid rain.
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 09, 2010 12:33AM
Is PTFE a silicone?
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 09, 2010 04:51AM
Quote
Profile Detailer
Sorry if these are going to be annoying questions...

What are you making in Australia? Is it like AGlaze or the G1/Nanolex type products?

Also, who makes this AT-5. I googled it and didn't find the manufacturer. Its not in an aerosol, is it? What I saw was Acrylic Teflon sealant.

I thought a lot about the way teflon works in a car care product. It is too neutral to bond and protect the paint, no? So does it instead protect the acrylic sealant on the paint rather than the paint itself?

Nope. Nothing like them. They are silane quartz. excellent. In Fact I am a Gtechniq approved applicator in South Australia. I work for the SA distributor/applicator as well as working at my own shop and also at a growing number of australia's best restoration/custom paint shops
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 09, 2010 01:57PM
Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a synthetic material accidentally invented in the late 1930s while a chemist was endeavoring to develop a new type of perfluorethylene-based refrigerant.


I would say it is not a silicone.

Plasticizers or dispersants are additives that increase the plasticity or fluidity of the material to which they are added; these include plastics, cement, concrete, wallboard, and clay. .
Re: POLYCHARGER
October 09, 2010 03:18PM
Another name for PTFE is "Teflon"
Re: POLYCHARGER
June 28, 2019 07:57PM
svr73 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Bill you have repeated nothing that is not already
> on the Polycharger website, sales BS.
>
> You have done nothing to explain to the public
> what Polycharger is, which is nothing but measured
> amino-functional silicone, which is what I have
> tried to tell you is what is in AT5, like all
> other paint sealants.
>
> INCORRECT. Tonnes do but what I have made and
> custom blended is not a polymer. it is glass and
> titanium. put it on and it turns to glass.
> measure your car with a thickness gauge afterwards
> and the reading increases.
> usually 110 microns from factory with our
> australian cars, after a treatment become 140 -
> 200 depending on how many times its been buffed on
> with orbital at speed 1 with the proper pads
>
> POLYCHARGER is not needed because I dont buy
> consumer grade products or use the crap sealants
> that Autogeek and Proper Auto care use. Its light
> years behind what I am using

I know this is old, but this was too tempting to respond to, to pass up.

Crap sealants? Seriously? I'm nearly 60 years old, and have been detailing cars since I was 15. I've bought several excellent products from Autogeek, Proper Auto Care and Autopia.. I've used Meguiar's M20 Polymer Sealant since the late 1970's, and have had it last 9 months to a year on cars garaged overnight and driven and parked out doors during the day. I've M21 Synthetic Sealant 2.0 for the last 7 years - equally as durable as M20. I've been pleasantly surprised by Meguiars Ultimate Liquid Wax, and seen it last a year. Outstanding for a polymer sealant that I can go buy at Walmart.

I've bought Collinite products from Autogeek, as well as Finish Kare. Several products that have lasted a year, easily, and stood up to harsh Detroit, Michigan winters.

Where do you get off calling these brands "crap"? And AT5? Seriously a PTFE product? Spare me. I sold PTFE for years - including bulk PTFE resins. PTFE resins can not bond to any paint, can not perform any protection on paint and that comes straight from DuPont, BASF, PPG, and Axalta Coating Systems (formerly DuPont's paint manufacturing division).



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/28/2019 07:58PM by Len_A.
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